Making a mockery of marking: The new GCSE English Language mocks

The following is a guest post from the mastermind of Comparative Judgement, Dr Chris Wheadon. The marking of English Language is likely to be extremely challenging this year. English Language has long form answer

Is criticising learning styles an attack on the poor?

Richard Olsen is a PhD candidate at Monash University studying “pedagogical capacity, effectiveness and quality in a changing world”. He recently linked to this Australian Research Summary of Learning Styles saying, “Attacking learning

Hirsch vs Engelmann: “No scientific basis for Direct Instruction”?

No one seems clear who first said it, but it’s become an abiding truth of journalism that, “If a dog bites a man, that is not news. But if a man bites

Less marking, more feedback: A challenge and a proposal

I’ve been arguing for some time that if teachers spent less time marking (by which I mean writing comments on students’ work) then they might have a lot more time for giving

Marking is an act of folly

Contrary to popular belief, marking and feedback are not the same thing. Clearly they’re connected – and, ideally most marking has the intention of giving feedback – but the process of marking

More good proxies for learning

A few days ago, I wrote about a brief online discussion I had with Dan Willingham on the importance of thinking hard. In the comments, Greg Ashman pointed out that thinking hard

Seven Theses on Education

Dennis Hayes, professor of education at Derby University and co-author of The Dangerous Rise of Therapeutic Education recently wrote the following Facebook post: Seven Theses on Education 1. Education is solely concerned

Can thinking hard be incidental? A conversation with Daniel Willingham

For some time now, Rob Coe has been suggesting that a good proxy for students learning in lessons is that they “have to think hard”. This seemed eminently sensible and I’ve written

Context isn’t king

It’s become quite fashionable recently to say that there’s no best way to teach because what works depends on the context in which you teach. This is a considerable improvement on asserting

Bottom sets and the scourge of low-level disruption

In many English schools, low-level disruption is the norm. Children talking when expected to be silent, fiddling with equipment and each other, calling out, and generally not being ‘on task’ are all

What do we mean by ‘skills’?

Any definition of skills depends on knowledge. Joe Kirby has written persuasively about skills and knowledge forming a double helix – inseparably intertwined and mutually interdependent. This is definitely a more helpful way to think, but it

What are ‘thinking skills’ and can we teach them?

…from a purely theoretical standpoint alone, it hardly seems plausible that a strategy of inquiry that must necessarily be broad enough to be applicable to a wide range of disciplines and problems can