Reframing the debate: It’s not what you do, it’s why you do it

For the past few years I’ve regularly railed against anyone who claims that either there is no debate about the best way to teach, or that said debate isn’t worth having because the

What teachers need to know about intelligence – Part 2: The effects of education

In Part 1 of this series I laid out why IQ matters and that, far from being a banal measure of merely of how well some people do in a series of

What teachers need to know about intelligence – Part 1: Why IQ matters

Intelligence is required to be able to know that a man knows not. Montaigne Although it’s become a truism to say we know relatively little about how our brains work, we know

Should teachers do what children want?

Every weekday morning, my daughters both moan about having to get up for school. They moan about their teachers and they moan about homework. Given free rein, they would spend all day

The problem with problem solving (or, why I struggle to reset my clock)

When the clocks went forward in March and we arrived in British Summer Time, I made an abortive attempt to change the time on my car’s clock. I knew, from having eventually

Why parents should support schools

Like all parents, I want the best for my children. When they’re unhappy, I’m unhappy. When they suffer injustice, I’m incensed. When their school makes a decision I disagree with, my first

Can we improve school interviews? Part 3: The interview lesson

In Part 1 of this series I reviewed some of the evidence on what makes for effective interviews, and in Part 2 I looked specifically at creating a less biased, more structured

Can we improve school interviews? Part 2: Intuition vs. statistical prediction

In Part 1 I reviewed some of the research around the best way to recruit and how this might apply to school recruitment. One of the suggestion I made was that schools should

Can we improve school interviews? Part 1: A brief review of the research

Recruitment for most employers is straightforward: you advertise, read through applications, invite the people you like in for an interview, think about it for a bit and then enter into negotiations with

Easy is easy, hard is hard

Recently, I had the ill luck to be present for a friend’s five-year-old daughter’s birthday party. To add to the naturally generated mayhem of putting 30 small children in a space with

Practice vs. talent: Five principles for effective teaching

Are we the way we are because of our natures or is talent just the product of hard work? Which matters more natural ability of practice? A few years ago my mother

Is resilience even a thing?

There is but an inch of difference between the cushioned chamber and the padded cell. G. K. Chesterton Resilience – being able to bounce back from setbacks and cope with challenges – seems an