Category Archives: psychology

What does the Theory of Multiple Intelligences tell us abut how to teach?

As I explained here, the scientific consensus is that intelligence is general. That is, if you are good at verbal comprehension, you’ll also tend to be good perceptual organisation, and if you’re good

What teachers need to know about intelligence – Part 2: The effects of education

In Part 1 of this series I laid out why IQ matters and that, far from being a banal measure of merely of how well some people do in a series of

What teachers need to know about intelligence – Part 1: Why IQ matters

Intelligence is required to be able to know that a man knows not. Montaigne Although it’s become a truism to say we know relatively little about how our brains work, we know

The problem with problem solving (or, why I struggle to reset my clock)

When the clocks went forward in March and we arrived in British Summer Time, I made an abortive attempt to change the time on my car’s clock. I knew, from having eventually

Can we improve school interviews? Part 3: The interview lesson

In Part 1 of this series I reviewed some of the evidence on what makes for effective interviews, and in Part 2 I looked specifically at creating a less biased, more structured

Can we improve school interviews? Part 2: Intuition vs. statistical prediction

In Part 1 I reviewed some of the research around the best way to recruit and how this might apply to school recruitment. One of the suggestion I made was that schools should

Is resilience even a thing?

There is but an inch of difference between the cushioned chamber and the padded cell. G. K. Chesterton Resilience – being able to bounce back from setbacks and cope with challenges – seems an

Why ‘grammar schools for all’ won’t work

A better, but overlong, title for this would be “Why grammar schools don’t work for all and why ‘grammar schools for all’ (probably) won’t work”. At the birth of the comprehensive school

The promise and danger of neuroscience

With the advent of increasingly inexpensive access to brain imaging technology, neuroscience has entered a fascinating period of rapid advancement. The ability to generate images of what’s going on in our brains

A summary of my arguments about education

And still they gazed, and still the wonder grew, that one small head could carry all he knew. Oliver Goldsmith A tradition without intelligence is not worth having. T. S. Eliot The

Why do we forget stuff? Familiarity vs recall

Now and then, I’ve taught whet seemed to be a successful lesson. I’d explain challenging content, check for understanding, get some great responses to consolidation activities and, at the end of the

The problem with ‘reading along’

It has become an unwritten law of teaching that when reading aloud to students, the teacher must ensure students are reading along in their own copy of the text. This is, I