Tag Archives: Daniel Kahneman

Can we improve school interviews? Part 2: Intuition vs. statistical prediction

In Part 1 I reviewed some of the research around the best way to recruit and how this might apply to school recruitment. One of the suggestion I made was that schools should

Can we improve school interviews? Part 1: A brief review of the research

Recruitment for most employers is straightforward: you advertise, read through applications, invite the people you like in for an interview, think about it for a bit and then enter into negotiations with

On gimmicks

What is a gimmick? The dictionary defines it as “a trick or device intended to attract attention, publicity, or trade.” So, putting a cartoon tiger on a packet of breakfast cereal in order

Go Compare!

Another one from Teach Secondary, this one from their assessment special. This time it’s an over view of Comparative Judgement. Human beings are exceptionally poor at judging the quality of a thing

We don’t know what we don’t know: the uses of humility

Humility is the only true wisdom by which we prepare our minds for all the possible changes of life. George Arliss In my last post I challenged the widely-held belief that teachers’

Tests don’t kill people

Tests Gun don’t kill people, rappers do Goldie Lookin Chain I spent the day yesterday at the Department for Education thinking about how best to cut down on the “unnecessary workload” associated with

Five techniques for overcoming overconfidence & improving decision-making

One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid, and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision. Bertrand Russell Every

“Works for me!” The problem with teachers’ judgement

It is with our judgments as with our watches: no two go just alike, yet each believes his own. Alexander Pope One of the difficulties inherent in challenging teachers’ judgments is that

Teaching for independence: thinking, memory & mastery

Truth gains more even by the errors of one who, with due study and preparation, thinks for himself, than by the true opinions of those who only hold them because they do

Squaring the circle: can learning be easy and hard?

Regular readers will know I’ve been ploughing a furrow on this question for quite a while now. Last June I synthesised my thinking in this post: Deliberately difficult – why it’s better to make