Tag Archives: Graham Nuthall

Learning is liminal

I am a part of all that I have met; Yet all experience is an arch wherethrough Gleams that untravelled world, whose margin fades For ever and for ever when I move.

How do we know if a teacher’s any good?

Obviously enough, not all teachers are equal. But how do we know which ones are any cop? Well, we just do, don’t we? Everyone in a school community tends to know who’s doing

Why AfL might be wrong, and what to do about it

Some cows are so sacred that any criticism of them is fraught with the risk of bumping up against entrenched cognitive bias. We are fantastically bad at recognizing that our beliefs are

Focusing on performance is the enemy of the growth mindset

Over the past year or so I’ve been following a line of thinking which has gone something like this: Learning and performance are not the same thing. Pupils’ performance in lessons does

Still grading lessons? A triumph of experience over hope

Hope is a good breakfast, but it is a bad supper. Francis Bacon To paraphrase Rob Coe’s seminal research, yesterday’s National Teacher Enquiry Network (NTEN) conference at KEGS in Chelmsford was a triumph

Has lesson observation become the new Brain Gym?

I’ve thought a lot about lesson observation over the past couple of years and have come to the conclusion that it is broken. What is most worrying is that it is almost

Motivation: when the going gets tough, the tough get going

If ever you get embroiled in a discussion on Learning Styles you may well be confronted with the chestnut of motivation. Learning styles, it seems to me, are all about motivation and

Why can’t we tell a good teacher through lesson observations?

No teacher is so good – or so bad – that he or she cannot improve. Dylan Wiliam The English education system is obsessed with ascertaining the quality of teachers. And what

Deliberately difficult – why it’s better to make learning harder

The most fundamental goals of education are long-term goals. As teachers and educators, we want targeted knowledge and skills to be acquired in a way that makes them durable and flexible. More

Planning Lessons – lessons I’ve learned from lessons I’ve taught

This is a summary and a drawing together of several earlier posts. I consider it a refinement of my thinking and something which is painstakingly (and grandiosely) groping its way towards a total

The problem with progress Part 3: Designing lessons for learning

Over my last couple of posts I’ve suggested that you can’t see learning in lessons, you can only infer it from students’ performance. This means that as a teacher, when you get

The problem with progress Part 2: Designing a curriculum for learning

Can progress be both rapid and sustained? We start out with the aim of making the important measurable and end up making only the measurable important. Dylan Wiliam ‘Rapid and sustained progress’ is Ofsted’s key