Tag Archives: John Hattie

How helpful is Hattie & Donoghue’s model of learning? Part 1: The problem with depth

I saw John Hattie speak recently at a conference on his latest re-imagining of his Visible Learning work. He was an excellent speaker and charming company. I was particularly flattered that he asked

Context isn’t king

It’s become quite fashionable recently to say that there’s no best way to teach because what works depends on the context in which you teach. This is a considerable improvement on asserting

The feedback continuum: why reducing feedback helps students learn

The effects of feedback are more complex than we often realise. While expertise and mastery is unlikely to develop without feedback it’s certainly not true to say that giving feedback results in expertise

John Hattie and the magical power of prediction

“Optimism and stupidity are nearly synonymous.” Hyman G. Rickover — Speech to US Naval Post Graduate School, March 16, 1954 In this post I picked up on a rather odd comment made by Professor

Why I like ‘tick n flick’

It is vain to do with more what can be done with less. William of Ockham Tick n flick – the practice of flicking through students’ exercise books and ticking to indicate

Whose research is it anyway?

The TES reports today that Professor Hattie, the crown prince of education research, isn’t much keen on teachers conducting research in their classrooms. Apparently he thinks we should leave education research in

The Unit of Education

If you cannot measure it, you cannot improve it. Lord Kelvin A lot of education research is an attempt to measure the effects of teaching (or teachers) on learning (or pupils.) But

Are we fetishising marking?

When you make something a fetish, ashes and dusts will laugh at you, because they know even the most valuable fetishes will turn into dusts and ashes! Mehmet Murat ildan Last night

What does John Hattie think about education?

If you don’t yet know, BBC Radio 4 have lined up a series of 8 interviews with the leading lights of the education world. In the second programme of the series, Sarah Montague

The problem with SatNavs, or how feedback can prevent learning

I’m not an especially good driver, but I’m a truly terrible navigator. This used to mean that I would get lost. A lot. When I first moved to Bristol in 2001 I bought an

Getting feedback right Part 4: How can we increase pupils’ aspiration?

You may remember that over the past few weeks I’ve been trying to refine my thinking about how we can improve the way we give feedback. If you haven’t already read the

Everything we’ve been told about teaching is wrong, and what to do about it!

It was great to be back at the IOE for Pedagoo London 2014, and many thanks must go to @hgaldinoshea & @kevbartle for organising such a wonderful (and free!) event. As ever there’s never enough time to